_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Two-Day Meeting

“Modeling and Computation of Shocks and Interfaces”

Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions

Sorbonne Université, Paris

 March 20 and 21, 2019

Location: lecture room 15-16–309

Organizer: Philippe G. LeFloch (Paris)

Supported by the ModCompShock ITN project


Speakers

Stavros Avgerinos (Catania)

Benjamin Boutin (Rennes)

Frédéric Coquel (Ecole Polytechnique)

Charalambos Makridakis (Brighton)

Carlos Pares (Malaga)

Giovanni Russo (Catania) 


Titles of the Lecture and Schedule

 

Wednesday March 20

11am–noon: Benjamin Boutin Finite difference convergence results for linear hyperbolic initial-boundary value problems —- FIRST TALK CANCELLED — We will start at 2pm

2pm-3pm Carlos Pares Well-balance high-order finite volume methods for systems of balance laws

3:30pm-4:30pm: Giovanni Russo Semi-implicit schemes for all-speed flows in gas dynamics and shallow water equations

 

Thursday March 21rst

10am-11am Stavros Avgerinos A semi-implicit scheme for the Exner model

11:30am Charalambos Makridakis Approximate Young measures, kinetic models and measure valued solutions of hyperbolic problems.

2:30pm: Frédéric Coquel Jin and Xin’s relaxation schemes with defect measure corrections for nonlinear systems of conservation laws

 



 Practical informations

The talks will take place in the main lecture room 309 of the Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, Sorbonne Université, which is located in the building 15-16.

Address: 4 Place Jussieu, 75258 Paris. Subway station: Jussieu.

List of hotels in the vicinity of the university

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Seminar at the

Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions

Sorbonne Université, Paris

Organizers

 Philippe G. LeFloch (Sorbonne, Paris)

 Jacques Smulevici (Sorbonne, Paris)

Jérémie Szeftel (Sorbonne, Paris)


Dates of the Seminar this Winter-Spring 2019

February 19, March 18, May 6


 

Tuesday February 19, 2019

room 15/16-309

 

 14h João Costa (Lisbon)

Strong cosmic censorship, linear waves, and quasi-normal modes

Abstract. I will present some recent results concerning the Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture (SCCC) in the presence of a positive cosmological constant. I will start by reviewing some of the progress made in the context of the Einstein-Maxwell-scalar field system in spherical symmetry and the linear wave equation in the black hole interior of Reissner-Nordström de Sitter. These results  show that the validity of the SCCC hinges on the precise decay rates of perturbations along the event horizon, which are known to be determined by the black hole’s quasi-normal spectrum. I will also discuss recent numerical computations of quasi-normal modes that suggest the failure of the SCCC in a near extremal regime of charged de Sitter black holes.

 

15h30 Shijie Dong (Paris)

Evolution of the U(1) Higgs Boson: global nonlinear stability with energy bounds

Abstract.  Relying on the hyperboloidal foliation method, we establish the nonlinear stability of the ground state for the so-called U(1) standard model of electroweak interactions. This amounts to establishing a global-in-time theory for the initial value problem for a nonlinear wave-Klein-Gordon system coupling massive (Dirac, scalar, gauge) equations together. In particular, we need to investigate here for the Dirac operator and the properties of energy functionals associated with the hyperboloidal foliation of Minkowski spacetime. We also provide a unified decay result for the Dirac equation when the mass coefficient can be arbitrarily small. Our energy bounds are uniform with respect to our (hyperboloidal) time variable, except for a mild log-growth. This is a joint work with P.G. LeFloch (Paris) and Z. Wyatt (Edinburgh).

 



 

Monday March 18, 2019

room 15/16-101

 

14h Maria-Caterina Valcu (Lyon)

Des équations de contrainte en relativité générale

Abstract. On s’intéresse à la caractérisation des données initiales en relativité générale, c’est à dire aux solutions des équations de contrainte. On s’appuie sur une version modifiée de la méthode conforme, introduite cette fois par David Maxwell, qui semble mieux adaptée à l’étude du système dans le cas où la courbure moyenne n’est pas constante. Par contre, le système devient bien plus compliqué du point de vue analytique. On travaille sous des conditions de petitesse sur nos paramètres, en petite dimension (n=3,4,5) et en présence d’un champ scalaire avec potentiel positif, ce qui mène à un terme non-linéaire dominant focalisant. L’analyse est assez fine et implique une série d’outils différents, dont des résultats de compacité et un théorème du point fixe.

15h30 Léo Bigorgne (Orsay)

Sharp asymptotic behavior of solutions of the 3d Vlasov-Maxwell system with small data

Abstract. The Vlasov-Maxwell system is a classical model in plasma physics. Glassey and Strauss proved global existence for the small data solutions of this system under a compact support assumption on the initial data. They used in particular that under these hypotheses, the velocity support of the particle density remains compact. This allows a clean separation between the characteristics of the wave equations (which are null geodesics) and those of the transport equation (which are time-like). We will see how vector field methods can be applied to revisit this problem. In particular, it allows to remove all compact support assumptions on the initial data and obtain sharp asymptotics on the solutions and their derivatives. We will also study the null structure of the system, which constitutes a crucial element of the proof and allows us to deal with high velocities.

 



Monday May 6, 2019

room 15/16-309

14h Erwann Delay (Avignon)

Le théorème d’énergie positive hyperbolique

Abstract. Le théorème d’énergie positive hyperbolique affirme que toute variété rieman-nienne complète, asymptotique à l’espace hyperbolique réel, et dont la courbure scalaire est minorée par celle du modèle, possède un vecteur énergie-impulsion de genre temps  dirigé vers le futur, ce vecteur étant nul seulement pour le modèle. Nous verrons une preuve de ce résultat en toutes dimensions et sans condition spin. Il s’agit d’un travail en collaboration avec Piotr Chrusciel.

15h30 Olivier Graf (Sorbonne)

TBA

Abstract. TBA

 



Monday June 24, 2018

room TBA

14h Oscar J. C. Campos-Dias (Southampton)

TBA

Abstract. TBA

15h30

TBA

Abstract.




 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Seminar at the

Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions

Sorbonne Université, Paris

Organizers

 Philippe G. LeFloch (Sorbonne, Paris)

 Jacques Smulevici (Sorbonne, Paris)

Jérémie Szeftel (Sorbonne, Paris)


Dates of the Seminar this Fall 2018

September 24, October 29, November 19


 

Monday September 24, 2018

room 15/16-309

 

 14h  Dietrich Häfner (Grenoble)

Scattering for Dirac and Klein-Gordon fields on the (De Sitter) Kerr metric and the Hawking effect

Abstract. We consider Dirac and Klein-Gordon fields on the (De Sitter) Kerr metric which describes rotating black holes. Whereas there exists a conserved L2 norm for the Dirac field, no positive conserved quantity exists for the Klein-Gordon field, which makes the analysis more difficult for the latter. We obtain asymptotic completeness results for the Dirac field on the Kerr and for the Klein-Gordon field on the De Sitter Kerr metric. We then present a rigorous result about the Hawking effect for fermions in the setting of a collapse of a rotating charged star. This effect predicts the creation of particles by black holes.

 

15h30 Jean-Philippe Nicolas (Brest)

Peeling for scalar fields on the Kerr metric

Abstract. The peeling is an asymptotic behavior of massless fields along outgoing null geodesics in asymptotically flat spacetimes, initially observed by Sachs at the beginning of the 1960’s, then reformulated in very simple terms by Penrose in 1965 using conformal geometry. The question of its genericity, especially when talking about the peeling of the Weyl tensor of an Einstein spacetime, was controversial for several decades after Penrose’s paper. For Einstein’s equations, the question is now essentially settled, but given an Einstein spacetime, it is not clear whether there is a large class of Cauchy data giving rise to solutions with a good peeling. Lionel Mason and the speaker answered the question for fields of spin 0, 1/2 and 1 on Schwarzschild’s spacetime in 2009 and 2012. We extended recently the results to linear and non linear scalar fields on the Kerr geometry in a joint work with Pham Truong Xuan. We shall recall the history of the subject, describe the principles of the approach developed with Lionel Mason and talk about the specific features of our work for Kerr metrics.

 



 

Monday October 29, 2018

room 15/16-101

 

14h Joe Keir (Cambridge)

The weak null condition and the p-weighted energy method

Abstract. The Einstein equations in wave coordinates are an example of a system which does not obey Klainerman’s “null condition”. Their failure to satisfy this condition leads to many difficulties, both in Lindblad-Rodnianski’s proof of global existence and in any attempt to apply other techniques to these equations. One such technique is the “p-weighted energy method” of Dafermos- Rodnianski, which is a very powerful and robust method that can easily be adapted to understand the behavior of waves in many interesting situations, including black holes. In this talk I will explain how to modify this method to systems which only obey the “weak null condition”, including the Einstein equations. This involves adapting the p-weighted energy method, and combining it with the many of the geometric methods used by Christodoulou and Klainerman. Among other things, this allows us to enlarge the class of wave equations which are known to admit small-data global solutions, and it also yields a detailed description of null infinity. In particular, in some situations we can understand the geometric origin of the slow decay towards null infinity exhibited by these systems: it is due to the formation of “shocks at infinity”.

 

15h30 Volker Schlue (Paris)

Scattering from infinity for semi-linear wave equations

Abstract. I will discuss the construction of global solutions from scattering data (at null infinity) for various semi-linear wave equations on Minkowski space satisfying the (weak) null condition. I will elaborate on the proof which relies, i) on a fractional Morawetz estimate, and (ii) on the construction of suitable approximate solutions from the scattering data. Finally I will outline the application of these results to Einstein’s equations in harmonic coordinates. This is joint work with Hans Lindblad.

 



Monday November 19, 2018

room 15/16-309

14h Adam Layne (Stockholm)

Stability within T2-symmetric expanding spacetimes

Abstract. We present a recently completed, non-polarized analogue of the asymptotic characterization of T2-symmetric Einstein flow solutions by P. LeFloch and J. Smulevici. We impose a far weaker condition, but obtain similar rates of decay for the normalized energy and associated quantities. Critical to this work have been novel numerical simulations which indicate that there is locally attractive behavior for those T2-symmetric solutions not subject to this weakened condition. This local attractor is distinct from the local attractor in our main theorem, thereby indicating that the polarized asymptotics are on one hand stable within a larger class than merely polarized solutions, but unstable within all T2-symmetric solutions.

 

15h30 Grigorios Fournodavlos (Sorbonne)

Dynamics of the Einstein vacuum equations about the Schwarzschild black hole interior

Abstract. We will talk about the dynamical behavior of the Schwarzschild black hole singularity, in the context of the Einstein equations in vacuum, from the point of view of the Cauchy problem in general relativity. As it is well known, the Schwarzschild singularity is highly unstable under arbitrarily small perturbations, which makes the study of its dynamics in full generality a difficult problem. We will begin by giving an overview of the current status of the near-Schwarzschild-black hole interior problem and we will compare it to the dynamics observed near other singularity models, in black hole interiors or Big Bangs. Then we will discuss linear and non-linear partial results in the near-Schwarzschild case, both backwards and forwards in time, with and without symmetries.




 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

International Conference

MATHEMATICAL GENERAL RELATIVITY

Monday May 28 to Friday June 1rst 2018

Institut Henri Poincaré

11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris

Invited Speakers

 

  • Spyros Alexakis (Univ. of Toronto)
  • Xinliang An (Univ. Toronto)
  • Lars Andersson (Einstein Inst., Potsdam)
  • Stefanos Aretakis (Princeton)
  • Grigorios Fournodavlos (Univ. of Cambridge)
  • Dejan Gajic (Cambridge University)
  • Peter Hintz (Univ. of California, Berkeley)
  • Gustav Holzegel (Imperial College, London)
  • Cécile Huneau (Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau)
  • Jérémie Joudioux (Univ. of Vienna)
  • Jonathan Luk (Stanford Univ.)
  • Sun-jin Oh (Korea Inst. Advanced Study)
  • Andrzej Rostworowski (Univ. Krakow)
  • Jan Sbierski (Oxford Univ.)
  • Yakov Shlapentokh-Rothman (Princeton)
  • Volker Schlue (Sorbonne Univ.)
  • Jérémie Szeftel (Sorbonne Univ.)

Schedule of the conference

Schedule for MONDAY

  • 9:00am coffee
  • 9:30am L. Andersson    
  • 10:30am coffee break.
  • 11:00am S. Alexakis
  • 2:30pm P. Hintz 
  • 3:30pm coffee break
  • 4:00pm V. Schlue

Schedule for TUESDAY

  • 9:00am: coffee
  • 9:30am J Joudioux    
  • 10:30am coffee break
  • 11:00am G. Fournodavlos
  • 2:30pm Sun-jin Oh 
  • 3:30pm coffee break
  • 4:00pm D Gajic

Schedule for WEDNESDAY

  • 9:00am coffee
  • 9:30am G Holzegel   
  • 10:30am coffee break
  • 11:00am Y. Shlapentokh-Rothman
  • noon:  C. Huneau
  • 7:00pm Reception at Sorbonne Univ.
    Central Tower, Jussieu campus, 4 Place Jussieu

Schedule for THURSDAY

  • 9:00am coffee
  • 9:30am S. Aretakis    
  • 10:30am coffee break
  • 11:00am J. Sbierski
  • 2:30pm A. Rostworowski 
  • 3:30pm coffee break
  • 4:00pm  X. An

Schedule for FRIDAY

  • 9:00am: coffee
  • 9:30am  J. Szeftel 
  • 10:30am coffee break
  • 11:00am J Luk

Titles and attracts of the lectures

  • Spyros Alexakis (Univ. of Toronto): Singularity formation in black hole interiors: Polarized perturbations of SchwarzschildAbstract: We consider the stability of the Schwarzschild singularity in vacuum under polarized and axially symmetric perturbations. We find that the space-like singularities persist under such perturbations, but their dynamics exhibit a great richness, consistent with the asymptotically velocity term dominated behavior. The result relies crucially on a new approach for the Einstein equations in axial symmetry. Joint work with G. Fournodavlos.
  • Xinliang An (Univ. Toronto):  On apparent horizon formation.

    Abstract:Combining both hyperbolic and elliptic techniques, we study the formation of a marginally outer trapped tube (apparent horizon) in gravitational collapse. Analytic and geometric properties of this apparent horizon will also be discussed.

  • Lars Andersson (Einstein Inst., Potsdam): Linear stability for the Kerr spacetime.

    Abstract: The Teukolsky Master Equation governs the dynamics of linearized gravity on the Kerr rotating black hole spacetime. Recent work of Ma, and of Dafermos, Holzegel and Rodnianski provides energy, Morawetz, and pointwise decay estimates for solutions of the Teukolsky equation. In this talk I shall show how to derive improved decay estimates for the Teukolsky equation and explain how such results can be used to prove linearized stability for the Kerr spacetime, including energy, Morawetz, and pointwise estimates for the linearized metric. The proof relies on using a radiation gauge. This is based on ongoing joint work with Thomas Bäckdahl, Pieter Blue, and Siyuan Ma.

  • Stefanos Aretakis (Princeton): Asymptotics for the wave equation on black hole backgrounds

    Abstract: We will present asymptotic results for solutions to the wave equation for the full Reissner-Nostrom family of black holes. These spacetimes are spherically symmetric asymptotically flat solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell system. We will consider both the sub-extremal and the extremal cases. We will see that conservation laws on null hypersurfaces play an important role in the precise late-time asymptotics for solutions to the wave equation. For the extremal Reissner-Nordstrom the situation is more subtle given that there are two independent conservation laws (in contrast to the sub- extremal where this is only one such conservation law). We will also present a scattering theory in the extremal case which in particular allows us to construct exponentially decaying smooth solutions. This work is joint with Gajic (Cambridge) and Angelopoulos (UCLA).

  • Grigorios Fournodavlos (Univ. of Cambridge): On ‘hard stars’ in general relativity

    Abstract: After a brief review of the classical results on gravitational collapse in spherical symmetry, from the Oppenheimer-Snyder model (1939) to Christodoulou’s two-phase model (1995), I will discuss one possible end state in the latter model: hard stars. These are idealized models of neutron stars. I will present a variational characterization and discuss its relevance to the orbital stability problem in spherical symmetry. Various obstacles to a global in time result are outlined, in particular the absence of a dispersion mechanism, the trapped surface formation scenario due to reflecting boundary conditions (cf. AdS-scalar field) and the possibility of phase transitions within the two phase model to avoid Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. This is a joint work with Volker Schlue.

  • Dejan Gajic (Cambridge University): Conservation laws and late-time tails of waves on Schwarzschild for all angular momenta

    Abstract: In 1972, Price suggested that inverse polynomial tails should be present in the late-time behaviour of scalar fields on Schwarzschild black holes with fixed angular momentum and the decay rates should depend in a precise manner on the angular momentum. In the decades since, many features of these tails have been explored both numerically and heuristically. The presence of polynomial tails along event horizons has important implications for the nature of singularities inside dynamical black holes. In this talk I will discuss work done in collaboration with Y. Angelopoulos and S. Aretakis that establishes rigorously the existence of these polynomial late-time tails in Schwarzschild spacetimes. I will give a sketch of how the decay rates of Price can be derived using only physical space methods and how the coefficients in the late-time asymptotics of the scalar field are related to the existence of conservation laws.

  • Peter Hintz (Univ. of California, Berkeley): Global stability problems

    Abstract: I will discuss the problem of proving the stability of (families of) exact spacetimes (M,g) such as Minkowski space or the family of Kerr-de Sitter (KdS) black holes as solutions of Einstein’s vacuum equation, focussing on geometric aspects of this problem: how to compactify M for the purpose of analyzing the underlying nonlinear wave equation; how to choose a gauge to break the diffeomorphism invariance of Einstein’s equation; and the role of constraint damping.

  • Gustav Holzegel (Imperial College, London): Boundedness and Decay for Solutions to the Teukolsky Equation on slowly rotating Kerr spacetimesAbstract.

    Abstract: I will outline a proof (joint work with M. Dafermos and I. Rodnianski) of boundedness and polynomial decay statements for solutions of the spin ±2 Teukolsky equations on a Kerr exterior background with parameters satisfying |a| ​<< M. The estimates are obtained through natural generalisations of the higher order quantities P and \underline{P} introduced in our previous work on the linear stability of the Schwarzschild metric.

  • Cécile Huneau (Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau): High frequency limit for Einstein equations with U(1) symmetry.

    Abstract: I will present the construction of a family of solutions to vacuum Einstein equations with U(1) symmetry which consist of an arbitrary number of high frequency waves travelling in different directions. In the high frequency limit, our family of solutions converges to a solution of Einstein equations coupled to null dusts. This construction is an illustration of the so called backreaction, studied by physicists (Isaacson, Burnet, Green, Wald…) : the small scale inhomogeneities have an effect on the large scale dynamics in the form of an energy impulsion tensor in the right-hand side of Einstein equations. This is a joint work with Jonathan Luk (Stanford).

  • Jérémie Joudioux (Univ. of Vienna): The vector-field method for the transport equation with application to the Einstein-Vlasov system.

    Abstract: The vector-field method, developed by Klainerman, was a key tool to understand the global existence of solutions to quasi-linear wave equations. In a series of work in collaboration with D. Fajman (Vienna), and J. Smulevici (Orsay), the vector- field method is extended to the relativistic transport equation where it is used to derive decay estimates for velocity averages for solutions to the relativistic Vlasov equation. An important application of this method is the proof of the stability of Minkowski space as a solution to the Einstein-Vlasov system. I will present in this talk this commutator technique for the transport equation, and describe the decay estimates for velocity averages, and sketch the key steps of the stability proof.Joint work with D. Fajman (Vienna) and J. Smulevici (Orsay).

  • Jonathan Luk (Stanford Univ.): The interior of extremal black holes

    Abstract: I will contrast the interior regions of subextremal and extremal black holes and present a recent result regarding the interior of dynamical extremal black holes for the Einstein-Maxwell-charged scalar field system in spherical symmetry. This is a joint work with Dejan Gajic.

  • Sun-jin Oh (Korea Inst. Advanced Study): Strong cosmic censorship and generic mass inflation for charged black holes in spherical symmetry.

    Abstract: I will first review a recent joint work with J. Luk, in which the C2-formulation of the strong cosmic censorship is proved for the Einstein-Maxwell-(real)-Scalar Field system in spherical symmetry for two-ended asymptotically flat data. More precisely, it was shown that a “generic” class of data for this model gives rise to maximal future developments which are future C2-inextendible. In the second part of the talk, I will present a new, complementary theorem (also joint with J. Luk) that for a further “generic” subclass of such data, the Hawking mass blows up identically along the Cauchy horizon. This result confirms, rigorously and unconditionally, the mass inflation scenario of Poisson-Israel and Dafermos for the model at hand.

  • Andrzej Rostworowski (Univ. Krakow):  New insights into nonlinear perturbations of vacuum spacetimes.

    Abstract: I will present a systematic and robust approach to nonlinear gravitational perturbations of maximally symmetric black holes. In particular, I will show that at each order of perturbation expansion, the system of perturbative Einstein equations can be reduced to two (for each gravitational mode in 3+1 dimensions on which the study will be focused) scalar wave equations, and the metric perturbations can be explicitly obtained, once the solutions to these scalar wave equations are known. That is, this approach extends the field of gravitational
    perturbations of black holes, initiated in the seminal Regge & Wheeler 57′ paper beyond linear order. The talk will be partially based on a recent work Phys. Rev. D96, 124026 (2017).

  • Jan Sbierski (Oxford Univ.): On the unique evolution of solutions to wave equations

    Abstract: The well-known theorem of Choquet-Bruhat and Geroch states that for given smooth initial data for the Einstein equations there exists a unique maximal globally hyperbolic development. In particular, the time-evolution of globally hyperbolic solutions is unique. This talk investigates whether the same results hold for quasilinear wave equations defined on a fixed background. We first present an example of a quasilinear wave equation for which unique evolution of smooth globally hyperbolic solutions in fact fails and contrast this case with the Einstein equations. We then proceed by presenting conditions which guarantee unique evolution. This talk is based on joint work with Felicity Eperon and Harvey Reall.

  • Yakov Shlapentokh-Rothman (Princeton Univ.): The asymptotically self-similar regime for the Einstein vacuum equations.

    Abstract: We will dynamically construct singular solutions to the Einstein vacuum equations which are asymptotically self-similar in that successive rescalings around the singularity converge to a self-similar solution. Connections both to Christodoulou’s bounded variation solutions of the spherically symmetric Einstein-scalar field system and to the ambient metric construction of Fefferman and Graham will be elaborated on. This is joint work with Igor Rodnianski.

  • Volker Schlue (Sorbonne Univ.): Expanding black hole space-times: Towards the stability of the cosmological region

    Abstract: The Schwarzschild de Sitter space-time is the simplest model of a black hole in the expanding universe. I will discuss the challenges arising in the stability problem for this solution of the Einstein vacuum equations with positive cosmological constant, and focus in particular on the evolution in the expanding region beyond the cosmological horizon of the black hole. I will present a result for the decay of the conformal Weyl curvature, and discuss its relation to the existence of asymptotic degrees of freedom in this problem. Moreover, I will discuss the behavior of solutions to the Eikonal equation in de Sitter, and questions related to the definition of asymptotic quantities.

  • Jérémie Szeftel (Sorbonne Univ.):  The nonlinear stability of Schwarzschild

    Abstract: I will discuss a joint work with Sergiu Klainerman on the stability of Schwarzschild as a solution to the Einstein vacuum equations with initial data  subject to a certain symmetry class.


Organizers  

Philippe G. LeFloch (Paris), Jacques Smulevici (Orsay), Jérémie Szeftel (Paris)

Funding

  • GEOWAKI
    “The analysis of geometric non-linear wave and kinetic equations”
    Principal investigator: Jacques Smulevici
    ERC Starting Grant 2016 

 

  • EPGR
    “The Evolution Problem in General Relativity”
    Principal investigator: Jérémie Szeftel
    ERC Consolidator Grant 2016

 

  • PERSU Sorbonne Université
    Principal investigator: Philippe LeFloch

 



List of hotels

(in the neighborhood of Jussieu, IHP, etc.) 

 


_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Seminar at the

Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions

Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris

Organizers

 Philippe G. LeFloch (Paris)

 Jacques Smulevici (Orsay)

Jérémie Szeftel (Paris)


Dates of the Seminar for this Academic year: 

October 9, November 20, December 4, February 12, March 12

+ Conference from May 28 to June 1rst


Monday March 12, 2018

room 15-16 309

 14h  Carla Cederbaum (Tubingen)

On foliations related to the center of mass in general relativity

Abstract.  We will discuss new developments in the analysis of asymptotic foliations by prescribed curvature in relativistic initial data sets with prescribed asymptotic decay, generalizing results by Huisken and Yau. We will relate these foliations to the definition of the center of mass of the initial data sets under consideration. The results presented are joint work with Cortier–Sakovich and with Nerz.

 15h30  Maxime Van de Moortel (Stanford)

Stability and instability in spherical symmetry of Reissner-Nordström black holes for the Einstein-Maxwell-Klein-Gordon model

Abstract. Penrose’s Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture is one of the central problems of Mathematical General Relativity. Its proof for the Einstein-Maxwell-Uncharged-Scalar-Field (EMSF) model in spherical symmetry relies on the formation of a Cauchy horizon that is C0 regular but C2 singular for generic Cauchy data. EMSF model however only admits two-ended black holes, unlike its charged analogue that allow for one-ended black holes, relevant to the study of charged gravitational collapse in spherical symmetry. In this talk I will present my work about spherically symmetric charged and massive scalar fields on black holes. This includes a study of the black hole interior, that relates the behavior of fields on the event horizon to the formation of a C0 regular and C2 singular Cauchy horizon. I will also mention my more recent work on the black hole exterior stability, for weakly charged massless scalar fields.

 


Monday February 12, 2018

room 15-16 309

 14h Shadi Tahvildar-Zadeh (Rutgers)

General relativity at the subatomic scale

Abstract. The idea that General Relativity (GR) may have something to say about the subatomic world is about as old as GR itself, but very few physicists have taken it seriously, and little is known rigorously about it. In this talk I use the problem of the “general- relativistic Dirac spectrum of Hydrogen” to convey the conceptual and technical issues one is up against, and survey recent results obtained in collaboration with my colleague Michael Kiessling and by some of our students and postdocs.

 15h30 Thomas W. Johnson  (Cambridge)

Abstract. I shall discuss the linear stability of the Schwarzschild family of black holes as solutions to the Einstein vacuum equations when expressed in a generalised wave gauge, a result which complements the recent work of Dafermos, Holzegel and Rodnianski in a similar vein as the pioneering result of Lindblad and Rodnianski complemented the monumental achievement of Christodoulou and Klainerman in establishing the global nonlinear stability of the Minkowski space. The proof relies on classical insights regarding the linearised Einstein equations about the Schwarzschild family, in particular the decoupling of certain gauge-invariant scalars into the Regge—Wheeler and Zerilli equations, and recent advances for the linear wave equation on the Schwarzschild exterior, both of which shall be reviewed.

 


Monday December 4, 2017

room 16-26 113

 14h Siyuan Ma (Potsdam)

On Maxwell field and linearized gravity in Kerr

Abstract.  I will consider both Maxwell field and linearized gravity on Kerr backgrounds, and present recent results in obtaining energy and Morawetz estimates for the extreme Newman-Penrose components.

 15h30 Claudio Paganini (Potsdam)

Mode stability on the real axis

Abstract.  I will discuss a generalization of the mode stability result of Whiting (1989) for the Teukolsky equation for the case of real frequencies. The main result states that a separated solution of the Teukolsky equation governing massless test fields on the Kerr spacetime, which is purely outgoing at infinity, and purely ingoing at the horizon, must vanish.

 


Monday November 20, 2017

room 16-26 113

 14h Frederico Pasqualotto (Princeton)

Nonlinear stability for the Maxwell–Born–Infeld system on a Schwarzschild background

Abstract. The Maxwell–Born–Infeld (MBI) theory is a hyperbolic system of PDEs which describes nonlinear electromagnetism. Due to its tensorial and quasilinear nature, this system can be seen as a nonlinear model problem to study the stability properties of solutions to the Einstein vacuum equations. In this talk, I will present a nonlinear stability result for the MBI system on a fixed Schwarzschild background, when the initial data are constrained to be small. A crucial element of the proof is the observation that some null components of the MBI field satisfy “good” Fackerell–Ipser equations, as in the linear Maxwell case. However, in the MBI case, these equations are coupled through cubic nonlinear right hand sides, which contain all components of the MBI field. In order to resolve the coupling, we prove high-order energy decay and, subsequently, pointwise decay for all the components of the MBI field. This is achieved through the application of many ideas developed in recent years, regarding the decay of linear fields.

 15h30 Volker Schlue (Paris)

On `hard stars’ in general relativity

Abstract. I will review the classical picture of gravitational collapse in spherical symmetry, from the Oppenheimer-Snyder model (1939) to Christodoulou’s two phase model (1995). I will then turn to the possible end states of gravitational collapse, in particular discuss non-trivial static solutions to the two-phase model, which are idealized models of neutron stars. The main results concern a variational characterization of hard stars, and I will outline their relevance for the orbital stability problem of neutron stars in spherical symmetry. I hope to conclude with a discussion of the various remaining problems that have to be overcome for a global in time result, in particular related to possible phase transitions in this model.

 


Monday October 9, 2017

room 15/16-309

 14h Daniel Monclair (Orsay)

Attractors in spacetimes and time functions

Abstract.  A time function on a Lorentzian manifold is a continuous real valued function which is increasing along all future directed causal curves. A result of Hawking states that the existence of a time function is equivalent to stable causality, i.e. the impossibility of generating timelike loops even after small perturbations of the metric. We will discuss a construction of time functions which is quite different from Hawking’s construction, in the sense that it produces functions that still have interesting properties for non stably causal spacetimes (while Hawking’s time functions fail to be continuous without stable causality). Our approach is based on a notion of attracting sets in spacetimes, following the work of Conley on Lyapunov functions.

 15h30 The-Cang Nguyen (Paris)

Global dispersion of self-gravitating massive matter in spherical symmetry

Abstract.  We study massive matter fields evolving under their own gravitational field and we generalize results established by Christodoulou for the spherically symmetric evolution of massless scalar fields governed by the Einstein equations. We encompass both Einstein’s theory and the f(R)-theory of modified gravity defined from a generalized Hilbert-Einstein functional depending on a nonlinear function f(R) of the spacetime scalar curvature R. This is a joint work with P.G. LeFloch and F. Mena.



 

Philippe LeFloch, DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH AT CNRS Email address: pglefloch [at] gmail.com

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